Give the Drummers Some!

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givethedrummersome.png

Give the Drummers Some!

24.95

The original "Give The Drummers Some!" has now been reissued in digital/pdf form, compatible with computers, iPads and smartphones. The downloadable 276 page book is complete with all 26 biographies, interviews, discographies and archival photos.

This package also includes 90 audio mp3s of the author playing many of the famous R&B and funk grooves created by these drummers... plus the transcriptions of these rhythms.

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Give The Drummers Some! tells the story of the rhythmic revolution of R&B, funk and soul, in the '60s and '70s, as told by the drummers who made it happen. The true originators of the current hip-hop beats tell their stories, and the history of "da funk" comes to life.

Through one-on-one interviews with 26 key drummers, plus biographical sketches, rare photos, rhythm transcriptions and the accompanying audio mp3 files, Jim Payne documents the exciting and innovative period when the rhythm of popular music was changed forever.

Give The Drummers Some! starts in New Orleans with Earl Palmer who played on all the classic Little Richard hits, then takes the reader on an historical voyage highlighting the drummers behind the stars, such as, Jabo Starks and Clyde Stubblefield (James Brown); Roger Hawkins (Wilson PickettAretha Franklin); Al Jackson, Jr. (Otis Redding); David Garibaldi (Tower of Power); Greg Errico (Sly & the Family Stone); Maurice White (EW&F); "Funky George" Brown (Kool & the Gang) and Ray Torres, the legendary unknown.


A monumental achievement, sets a new standard to which future educational music books will have to aspire.
— Adam Budofsky - Modern Drummer (5 stars)
“Give the Drummers Some” is brilliant. It was pretty much my guidebook in doing my whole Groove Alchemy project. I have a tremendous amount of respect for Jim.
— Stanton Moore
Really top notch. I’m gonna use it as a reference book
— Fred Wesley, former James Brown Band leader
Absolutely glorious. There’s not one aspect of it that’s not killin’.
— Mike Clark